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Mental Health

If you or someone you know is feeling suicidal, help is available. 

Call 911, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255),

or text the Crisis Line (741741).

Caring for your mental health is just as important as caring for your physical health. Below you will find some information on common mental health disorders.

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  Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Everyone is distractible sometimes. And most children have trouble sitting still. But ADHD is more than having trouble sitting still or being “busy.” ADHD exists across different settings (home, school, community). Individuals with ADHD have difficulty accomplishing things they want to do because they have trouble focusing.

Symptoms may include the following:

  • Distractibility/difficulty focusing
  • Restless/constantly in motion
  • Disorganized
  • Loses materials
  • Forgets directions/plans
  • Impulsive/does things without thinking
  • Poor time management
  • Interrupting
  • Trouble waiting their turn
  • Trouble finishing tasks/assignments
  • Daydreaming


How do you know when it is time to ask for help?

Many children with ADHD hear many messages each day to change their behavior. Children who hear these messages frequently begin to think they are bad or a problem. This can lead to additional concerns as they grow up. If your child is experiencing trouble in school, with friends, or with family due to these symptoms, it is time to get some help.

Mental health care providers can be located in the Parent Guide to Community Resources or at this site, or you can consult with your pediatrician or school support staff to help you find local resources.

  Anxiety

Everyone feels nervous or anxious sometimes. But anxiety becomes a mental health concern when those feelings get in the way of everyday life. Feelings of anxiety are associated with fear, worry, or dread. Sometimes those feelings are completely normal and helpful to our survival, but when those fears occur even when the child is safe, then that anxiety needs to be explored.

Symptoms can include the following:

  • Problems with sleep
  • Avoidance of situations/people/objects that frighten them
  • Eating problems
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Need for frequent reassurance
  • Does not want to be out of sight of parent
  • Difficulty focusing


How do you know when it is time to ask for help?

When the anxiety is getting in the way of your daily life or your child’s daily life. All children will need your reassurance from time to time, but if they are fearful of everyday situations and you cannot leave them alone, your child is experiencing extreme anxiety. If your child is so anxious that they do not want to play outside, go to the store, go to bed, or go to school, it is time to get some help.

Mental health care providers can be located in the Parent Guide to Community Resources or at this site, or you can consult with your pediatrician or school support staff to help you find local resources.

  Depression

Everyone feels sad from time to time. Depression is not the same as sadness. Depression persists over time and steals a person’s energy.

Symptoms can include the following:

  • Sleep problems
  • Marked changes in eating habits
  • Lack of enjoyment of activities once enjoyed
  • Hopelessness
  • Angry outbursts, irritability
  • Social withdrawal
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Low energy, fatigue
  • Feeling worthless


How do you know when it is time to ask for help?

If your child has stopped enjoying things they usually enjoy, avoids engaging with others, or shows significant changes in school performance, your child may be experiencing depression. If the above symptoms persist over weeks and are interfering with your child’s daily life, it’s time to consider asking for help.

Mental health care providers can be located in the Parent Guide to Community Resources or at this site, or you can consult with your pediatrician or school support staff to help you find local resources.

For Immediate Help

Call 911

Call 1-800-273-8255
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Text 741741
Crisis Text Line

Violence Prevention Program

6620 W. Capitol Drive
Milwaukee, WI 53216

Email: ViolencePrevention@milwaukee.k12.wi.us


Social and Emotional Learning Supervisor:

Kimberly Merath
Email: trateka1@milwaukee.k12.wi.us
Phone: 414-438-3593

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